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Hurricane Ingrid and Tropical Storm Manuel drench Mexico

Source: Reuters - Sun, 15 Sep 2013 18:23 GMT
Author: Reuters
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MEXICO CITY, Sept 15 (Reuters) - Hurricane Ingrid and Tropical Storm Manuel brought heavy rains to Mexico's Gulf and Pacific coasts on Sunday, causing landslides and flooding and prompting many Mexicans to adjust their plans to celebrate their national Independence Day.

Hurricane Ingrid, a Category 1 storm with sustained winds of 75 miles per hour (120 km per hour), was drenching Tamaulipas and Veracruz states on the Gulf coast, with thousands of people seeking emergency shelters as river levels rose.

More than 6,000 people are in temporary shelters or staying with family, Ricardo Mata, head of emergency services in Veracruz, told local media.

More people were being evacuated from low-lying towns in the northern part of Veracruz state as a precaution, Manuel Escalera, spokesman for the state's emergency services, told Reuters.

There have been landslides and localized flooding but no injuries or deaths reported, he said.

Winds from Ingrid, which was 120 miles (290 km) from Tampico, Veracruz at 1800 GMT, were not expected to reach land until early on Monday. Ingrid is forecast to make landfall on Monday morning in the south of Tamaulipas.

Two of Mexico's three major oil-exporting ports were closed on Sunday, but a spokesperson for state oil monopoly Pemex said all its operations in the area were operating normally.

On the Pacific coast, Tropical Storm Manuel was bringing 65 miles-per-hour (100 km-per-hour) winds, high waves and between 10 to 15 inches (25 to 38 cm) of rainfall to the area's beach resorts, including Acapulco.

Local authorities were also on watch for landslides and flooding from torrential rain in the Pacific coast states of Michoacan and Colima.

Because of Ingrid, several towns in Tamaulipas canceled plans for independence celebrations on Sunday night, local media reported. Usually Mexicans flock to their town square to hear local officials give the call to arms known as "El Grito", an echo of Miguel Hidalgo's original call to arms against the Spanish in 1810.

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