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PRESS DIGEST- British Business - Feb 10

Source: Reuters - Mon, 10 Feb 2014 01:29 GMT
Author: Reuters
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Feb 10 (Reuters) - The following are the top stories on the business pages of British newspapers. Reuters has not verified these stories and does not vouch for their accuracy.

The Telegraph

VODAFONE IN 5.8 BLN STG BID FOR SPAIN'S ONO

Vodafone has moved a step closer to acquiring Spanish cable company Ono after tabling a 7 billion euro ($9.53 billion) takeover bid as it attempts to revive its ailing European business. ()

NEW BANKING WATCHDOG TO BE HEADED BY OUTSIDER

Richard Lambert, the former head of the Confederation of British Industry, is expected to call on Tuesday for the new professional standards body to be led by a chairman from outside the banking fraternity. ()

The Guardian

BARCLAYS BLASTED OVER 'CATASTROPHIC' THEFT OF THOUSANDS OF CUSTOMER FILES

Barclays is under scrutiny by regulators and could face a hefty fine after thousands of confidential customer files were stolen in a data breach described as catastrophic by an adviser to Britain's business secretary, Vince Cable. ()

CITY BONUS ROW REIGNITES WITH BARCLAYS TO ADMIT £2BN IN PAYMENTS

Controversy over bonuses will be re-ignited this week when Barclays admits it paid its staff more than last year, fuelling predictions that the amount of bonuses paid out across the Square Mile since the 2008 crisis could soon hit 80 billion pounds. ()

The Times

ED DAVEY LEADS ATTACK ON GAS AND ELECTRICITY PROVIDERS

Ed Davey, Britain's Energy Secretary, has accused the Big Six gas suppliers of boasting an average profit margin three times higher than that of electricity companies, reserving particular ire for the market dominance of British Gas. ()

CROSSRAIL SEEKS BETTER RETURN ON PROPERTY

The company building the east-west rail line across London is seeking to cash in on the capital's rising property market in an attempt to make up a potential funding shortfall. ()

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