Maintenance. We are currently updating the site. Please check back shortly
Members login
  • TrustLaw
  • Members Portal
Subscribe Donate

S.Sudan rebels boycott latest round of peace talks

Source: Reuters - Mon, 10 Feb 2014 17:43 GMT
Author: Reuters
hum-war hum-ref
Jikany Nuer White Army fighters hold their weapons in Upper Nile State, February 10, 2014. REUTERS/Goran Tomasevic
Tweet Recommend Google + LinkedIn Email Print
Leave us a comment

(Adds details and context)

ADDIS ABABA, Feb 10 (Reuters) - South Sudanese rebels said they would boycott the next round of peace talks starting in Ethiopia on Monday unless the government freed political prisoners and sent home the Ugandan troops who have been supporting it.

The Addis Ababa talks, which secured a ceasefire last month, are intended to end a conflict that has claimed the lives of thousands of people and displaced more than half a million South Sudanese since it broke out on Dec. 15.

The rebels, lead by former vice president Riek Machar, said they wanted four remaining political prisoners held by the Juba government to be released and the Ugandan army, which has been backing President Salva Kiir, to withdraw from South Sudan.

"We are hereby informing all parties ... that we are abstaining from participating in the next round of peace talks, which are scheduled to take place in Addis Ababa today," the rebels said in a statement.

The said they had evidence that the Ugandan army was "still actively engaged in combat" despite a ceasefire, and accused Kiir's forces of besieging a United Nations compound housing displaced people in Juba.

Both sides have in the past accused each other of wanton killings and ethnic-based reprisals.

(Reporting by Aaron Maasho; writing by Drazen Jorgic; editing by Kevin Liffey)

We welcome comments that advance the story through relevant opinion, anecdotes, links and data. If you see a comment that you believe is irrelevant or inappropriate, you can flag it to our editors by using the report abuse links. Views expressed in the comments do not represent those of the Thomson Reuters Foundation. For more information see our Acceptable Use Policy.

comments powered by Disqus