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Syria fighting continues as peace talks falter

Source: Reuters - Wed, 12 Feb 2014 22:58 PM
Author: Reuters
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As Syria peace talks continue, so too does the fighting.

Amateur video allegedly shows rebels battling government forces on Wednesday during air strikes on the capital Damascus.

Other video, neither of which Reuters can verify, claims to show the aftermath of government bombing in Deraa.

It comes as residents are shepherded out of the besieged city of Homs under a fragile local ceasefire.

As residents leave, aid workers come in with food and supplies for those who remain.

All this as peace negotiations falter.

On Wednesday, the opposition presented a plan in Geneva that lays out its vision of post-war Syria and makes no mention of President Bashar al-Assad.

The plan calls for a U.N.-monitored total ceasefire across Syria.

It would also drive out all foreign combatants fighting on both sides of the civil war.

Opposition spokesman Louay Safi.

(SOUNDBITE) (English) SYRIAN OPPOSITION SPOKESMEN LOUAY SAFI SAYING:

"Forcing out or asking out, whatever it takes, every foreign fighters from the country."

But the government side refused to discuss political transition on Wednesday.

It said the idea wasn't on the day's agenda coordinated by U.N. mediator Lakhdar Brahimi.

Syria's presidential advisor Bouthaina Shabaan.

SYRIAN PRESIDENTIAL ADVISOR BOUTHAINA SHABAAN SAYING:

"We were surprised, our delegation was surprised, to find Brahimi giving the floor to the other side who started talking about the transitional governing body which is not really on the agenda."

There's concern now that the talks are running into the sand in a conflict that's killed well over 100,000 and shows no end in sight.

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