Thomson Reuters Foundation

Inform - Connect - Empower

Alabama lawmakers approve medical marijuana measure

Source: Reuters - Thu, 20 Mar 2014 22:16 GMT
Author: Reuters
Tweet Recommend Google + LinkedIn Email Print
Leave us a comment

By Verna Gates

BIRMINGHAM, Ala., March 20 (Reuters) - A medical marijuana bill unanimously passed both the Alabama House and Senate on Thursday and is headed to the desk of Gov. Robert Bentley, who has said he will sign it into law.

The measure makes it legal to possess only a prescribed medical grade extract known as CBD or cannabidiol, which is non-intoxicating.

The U.S. Congress in 1972 deemed the oil to have no accepted medical use and banned it.

However, some studies have shown it to be useful in treating a number of conditions, including seizures, and it has been legalized for use in 20 states, according to the Medical Marijuana ProCon website.

Called Carly's Law, the bill in Alabama originated to help control violent seizures suffered by a toddler with a severe neurological disorder.

The girl's family won the backing of Republican state Rep. Mike Ball, sponsor of the bill, and the governor, who has indicated his support.

The bill includes $1 million in funding for a neurology research project into cannabidiol oil at the University of Alabama at Birmingham.

"UAB will undertake research into the mechanisms underlying cannabidiol to learn more about its function and effect on seizures," said David Standaert, chairman of the university's Department of Neurology.

The extract is low in tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC, the psychoactive compound that gives users the feeling of being high. (Editing by Ellen Wulfhorst and Gunna Dickson)

We welcome comments that advance the story through relevant opinion, anecdotes, links and data. If you see a comment that you believe is irrelevant or inappropriate, you can flag it to our editors by using the report abuse links. Views expressed in the comments do not represent those of the Thomson Reuters Foundation. For more information see our Acceptable Use Policy.

comments powered by Disqus