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FACTBOX-Fort Hood shooting is the latest at U.S. military bases

Source: Reuters - Thu, 3 Apr 2014 21:32 GMT
Author: Reuters
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April 3 (Reuters) - A U.S. Army soldier on Wednesday opened fire in two administration buildings on the Fort Hood Army base in Texas, killing three service members and injuring 16 others before taking his own life.

Army officials on Thursday identified Specialist Ivan Lopez, 34, as the suspect in what was the biggest mass shooting at the base since 2009. A list of other recent and deadly shootings on U.S. military bases follows.

March 24, 2014 - Jeffrey Tyrone Savage, 35, a civilian truck driver, shot dead a sailor aboard the USS Mahan destroyer at a U.S. Navy base in Norfolk, Virginia, before being killed by base security forces.

Sept. 16, 2013 - Aaron Alexis, 34, who worked for a defense contractor, killed 12 people and wounded four others in a shooting spree at the Navy Yard in Washington before he was slain by police.

Nov. 5, 2009 - Major Nidal Hasan killed 13 people and injured more than 30 at Fort Hood, Texas, gunning down unarmed soldiers in a medical building with a laser-sighted handgun in what he later called retaliation for U.S. wars in the Muslim world. A military jury convicted the U.S. Army psychiatrist in 2013 and he was sentenced to death.

Oct. 27, 1995 - Sergeant William Kreutzer killed one officer and wounded 18 soldiers at Fort Bragg, N.C., during morning exercises before several soldiers tackled him. Kreutzer was sentenced to life in prison.

June 21, 1994 - Dean Mellberg, 20, shot and killed four people and wounded at least 20 at a hospital on Fairchild Air Force Base in Spokane, Washington. A military police officer fatally wounded Mellberg, who had been discharged a month earlier from the Air Force. (Reporting by Brendan O'Brien; editing by Gunna Dickson)

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