Maintenance. We are currently updating the site. Please check back shortly

Thomson Reuters Foundation

Inform - Connect - Empower

U.S. Justice Department's criminal division names new No. 2

Source: Reuters - Wed, 23 Apr 2014 20:58 GMT
Author: Reuters
Tweet Recommend Google + LinkedIn Email Print
Leave us a comment

By Aruna Viswanatha

WASHINGTON, April 23 (Reuters) - The U.S. Department of Justice has named Marshall Miller as the new No. 2 official in its criminal division, after a spate of departures thinned its top ranks, according to an internal memo obtained on Wednesday.

Miller, who was most recently chief of the criminal division at the U.S. Attorney's office in Brooklyn, is now the deputy head of the 600-lawyer criminal division at department headquarters in Washington, said a DoJ memo dated April 17.

The division, which is deep into closely-watched investigations of the manipulation of interest rate benchmark as well as foreign exchange rates, has been without a Senate-confirmed head for more than a year and is still waiting for the Senate to vote on Leslie Caldwell, Obama's pick to lead it.

The division is also responsible for a range of high-profile investigations, including into foreign bribery and anti-money laundering violations.

Miller has been with the U.S. Attorney's office since 1999, prosecuting terrorism and other cases.

"He's done a great job in Brooklyn," said John Buretta, Miller's predecessor in the criminal division until last November when he joined the law firm Cravath, Swaine & Moore.

"He's always trying to just be the backstop for everything, which really makes him, for this job, perfect," Buretta said.

Miller's appointment was first reported by The New York Times. (Reporting by Aruna Viswanatha, editing by G Crosse)

We welcome comments that advance the story through relevant opinion, anecdotes, links and data. If you see a comment that you believe is irrelevant or inappropriate, you can flag it to our editors by using the report abuse links. Views expressed in the comments do not represent those of the Thomson Reuters Foundation. For more information see our Acceptable Use Policy.

comments powered by Disqus
Most Popular
LATEST SLIDESHOW

Latest slideshow

See allSee all
FEATURED JOBS
Featured jobs