Maintenance. We are currently updating the site. Please check back shortly

Thomson Reuters Foundation

Inform - Connect - Empower

UK to host international meeting on stolen Ukrainian assets

Source: Reuters - Sun, 27 Apr 2014 23:01 GMT
Author: Reuters
cor-gov
Ukrainian demonstrators and supporters protest outside the Houses of Parliament in London December 10, 2013 REUTERS/Luke MacGregor
Tweet Recommend Google + LinkedIn Email Print
Leave us a comment

LONDON, April 28 (Reuters) - London will host a two-day international meeting this week aimed at helping Ukraine's government to recover stolen assets, Britain's interior ministry said on Monday.

Since the toppling of President Viktor Yanukovich in February, Ukrainian prosecutors have accused him and his aides of stealing billions of dollars. Yanukovich has said he has no foreign bank accounts or property abroad.

The April 29-30 Ukraine Forum on Asset Recovery, jointly organised by Britain and the United States, will be attended by senior government officials, judicial experts, prosecutors, financial intelligence analysts and regulators.

Ukrainian Interior Minister Arsen Avakov and U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder will be among those meeting in London.

"Building on our expertise in the field of asset recovery, it will also provide practical leadership and assistance to the Ukrainian government as they identify and recover assets looted under the Yanukovich regime and introduce political and economic reform," British Home Secretary Theresa May said.

London is the top destination for money from the former Soviet Union and many Ukrainian oligarchs have assets there.

Last month, Britain said it had been given a list of people suspected of being involved in the theft of Ukrainian assets and that it would send a team to Kiev to seek further evidence.

The Home Office (interior ministry) said that as well as planning practical steps for Ukraine, the meeting would work on international cooperation for the early tracing of assets and look at ways to trace assets hidden behind complex corporate structures.

"The message is clear - we are making it harder than ever for corrupt regimes or individuals around the world to move, hide and profit from the proceeds of their crime," said May.

(Reporting by Kylie MacLellan; Editing by Gareth Jones)

We welcome comments that advance the story through relevant opinion, anecdotes, links and data. If you see a comment that you believe is irrelevant or inappropriate, you can flag it to our editors by using the report abuse links. Views expressed in the comments do not represent those of the Thomson Reuters Foundation. For more information see our Acceptable Use Policy.

comments powered by Disqus
Most Popular
TOPICAL CONTENT
Topical content
LATEST SLIDESHOW

Latest slideshow

See allSee all
FEATURED JOBS
Featured jobs