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Gaza : Children caught in the crossfire

Source: Terre des hommes (Tdh) - Switzerland - Mon, 14 Jul 2014 07:51 GMT
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Gaza : Children caught in the crossfire

The latest escalation of violence in Gaza and southern Israel severely impacts children, who represent almost half of the Palestinian population. Rockets fired from and to Gaza caused numerous casualties, including 30 children.

“Children are locked down in their homes, they are terrified, crying or apathetic” explains Dr. Khitam Abu Hamad, Terre des hommes’ office manager in Gaza. “The present security situation forced Tdh to close temporarily down its care centre for working children in Beit Lahiya, in the north of the Gaza Strip. Repeated heavy bombing in the neighbourhood makes it too dangerous for the children and staff to go there” adds Juergen Wellner, country representative for Terre des hommes (Tdh) in Jerusalem.

Medical supplies, food, water and fuel are running out due to the blockage of the Gaza Strip. Furthermore, the recent bombings damaged health facilities, homes and schools, affecting even more the already fragile populations.

Terre des hommes, together with 33 organisations, urgently called today for a ceasefire and sustained solutions to the conflict in Gaza (link to AIDA statement).

Terre des hommes in the Palestinian Territories

Terre des hommes has been active in the Palestinian Territories since 1973. Today, the organisation runs projects in Gaza and Hebron on restorative juvenile justice and protection of working children.

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