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Emergency Gaza: «Instead of counting the number of dead children, we want to take care of the living»

Source: Terre des hommes (Tdh) - Switzerland - Mon, 4 Aug 2014 09:33 GMT
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More than 250 children died during the last four weeks in the Gaza Strip. A frighteningly growing number. At this point there is unfortunately no hope for a concrete and lasting improvement of the situation any way soon.

«The children are totally traumatized» tells Khitam Abu Hamad, our coordinator in Gaza. With the bombing of hospitals, schools and habitation, there is no safe space left for them. «Children in the shelters start to have skin diseases such as rashes, scabies and lice due to water deprivation and an acute lack of hygienic supplies».

 In the beginning of the week, we managed to deliver food parcels to more than 2000 persons that had lost everything. A drop in the ocean. «A team of Terre des hommes staff is ready to enter Gaza to support our colleagues there and to organize much needed emergency relief. Instead of counting the number of dead children, we want to take care of the living» affirms Joseph Aguettant, new representative of the Terre des hommes in Jerusalem.

 The people’s immediate needs continue to be basic necessities: food for young children, hygiene kits, medical supplies.

We need your support to organize this help in favor of the most vulnerable children.

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