Maintenance. We are currently updating the site. Please check back shortly
Members login
  • TrustLaw
  • Members Portal
Subscribe Donate

Gunmen wound official in Yemen, tribal dispute likely

Source: Thomson Reuters Foundation - Mon, 25 Mar 2013 13:29 GMT
Author: Reuters
hum-war
Tweet Recommend Google + LinkedIn Email Print
Leave us a comment

SANAA, March 25 (Reuters) - Gunmen wounded a senior Yemeni government official and killed his driver when they ambushed his car in Sanaa on Monday, an attack police said was probably an act of tribal violence.

The assailants, themselves in a car, shot at the vehicle carrying Abdullah al-Fadhli, head of the State Land and Properties Department, before driving away, a state security source told Reuters.

Fadhli was wounded but his driver died, said the source, who declined to be named.

"Armed men fired heavily at the four-wheel drive for several minutes, with gunmen in the car retaliating before armed forces from a nearby checkpoint intervened," a witness told Reuters.

No one has claimed responsibility for the killing but a police official said the gunmen appeared to be "supporters of a certain tribal leader," without elaborating.

Monday's attack was the latest in a series targeting security officials and politicians in the impoverished and often chaotic Arabian Peninsula state.

Although such attacks are frequently carried out by members of the al Qaeda wing in Yemen, the country is awash with arms and law and order is weak, meaning that disputes between civilians often end in violence.

Yemen's stability is a priority for the United States and its Gulf allies because of its strategic position next to oil exporter Saudi Arabia and shipping lanes. (Reporting By Mohammed Ghobari, Writing by Raissa Kasolowsky)

We welcome comments that advance the story through relevant opinion, anecdotes, links and data. If you see a comment that you believe is irrelevant or inappropriate, you can flag it to our editors by using the report abuse links. Views expressed in the comments do not represent those of the Thomson Reuters Foundation. For more information see our Acceptable Use Policy.

comments powered by Disqus
Most Popular
TOPICAL CONTENT
Topical content
LATEST SLIDESHOW

Latest slideshow

See allSee all
FEATURED JOBS
Featured jobs