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IPI: UPDATE: Israel strikes media building for second day in a row

International Press Institute (IPI) - Tue, 20 Nov 2012 11:16 GMT
Author: Naomi Hunt
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A media building in Gaza was hit by Israeli missiles for the second time in two days, resulting in the death of a leader from the militant group Islamic Jihad and the injury of several others, reports said. This was the second time that the building has been targeted within the last 36 hours.  Reuters said three missiles hit a shop on the third floor, throwing debris onto the street and starting a fire. The BBC’s Paul Danahar tweeted from the scene: “The last strike on this media building in #Gaza was called 'precision' by IDF. This one is not.”  In a press release sent shortly after the attack, the IDF said it had targeted a “hideout used by senior Palestinian Islamic Jihad operatives.” It went on to say that this “is a further example of how terror organizations cynically use those inside civilian populated institutions as human shields.”  Yesterday’s attacks on the building, which Israel said were meant to take out a Hamas communications centre, wounded eight people including a cameraman whose leg had to be amputated, reports said.   In an interview with Russia Today that took place on Sunday, Israel Defense Forces spokesperson Avital Leibovich stressed that Israel was leaving the Gaza border open so that journalists could cover the story on the ground, but added: “I think if a journalist chooses to locate himself near a Hamas facility, that’s a mistake.” IPI Deputy Director Anthony Mills said: “States have a responsibility to ensure the safety of journalists even when they are operating in conflict zones. We reiterate our call for all parties to recognize and respect the non-combatant status of journalists.” Copyright 2012 by International Press Institute and their affiliate SEEMO. All worldwide rights reserved.  

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