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Obama says N.Korea nuclear program a global threat

Source: Thomson Reuters Foundation - Tue, 12 Feb 2013 07:29 GMT
Author: Reuters
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By Roberta Rampton

WASHINGTON, Feb 12 (Reuters) - U.S. President Barack Obama said a nuclear test by North Korea was a "highly provocative act" that hurt regional stability, calling Pyongyang's nuclear program a threat to the United States, its allies, and to international security.

"The danger posed by North Korea's threatening activities warrants further swift and credible action by the international community. The United States will also continue to take steps necessary to defend ourselves and our allies," Obama said in a statement.

North Korea's third-ever nuclear test came less than 24 hours before Obama was slated to give his annual State of the Union address, a televised speech viewed by millions of Americans that is now almost certain to refer to North Korea's actions.

"This is a highly provocative act," Obama said, noting the test violated North Korea's obligations under United Nations and other international agreements.

North Korea is banned under U.N. Security Council resolutions from developing nuclear and missile technology. The tests drew condemnation from around the world.

The U.N. Security Council will hold an emergency meeting on North Korea's apparent nuclear test at 9:00 a.m. EST (1400 GMT) on Tuesday where the United States, South Korea and others could begin the lengthy process of pressing for more sanctions on Pyongyang.

"We will strengthen close coordination with allies and partners and work with our Six-Party partners, the United Nations Security Council, and other UN member states to pursue firm action," Obama said.

The six-party talks between China, the United States, North and South Korea, Japan, and Russia are aimed at ending North Korea's nuclear program. (Reporting by Roberta Rampton; Editing by John Stonestreet)

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