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Ugandan Grace gives birth to Bob in ShelterBox tent

Source: ShelterBox - Tue, 27 Nov 2012 13:26 GMT
Author: ShelterBox
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Grace Mutuwa used to live in her house in Bududa, a district in eastern Uganda. But, like many others, she was made homeless last July when heavy rains caused landslides on the slopes of Mount Elgon burying her home. ShelterBox responded and delivered tents to families in need, heavily pregnant Grace being one of them.

A ShelterBox Response Team (SRT) travelled to assess the need following further flooding in northeastern Uganda in the Kibaale District and the Teso and Lango sub-regions earlier this month. With no need found, the SRT returned to Bududa where they met Grace.

'When we came across Grace, she was also with her baby boy Bob,' said SRT member Liz Odell (UK). 'She had given birth to him in her ShelterBox tent one month ago. They are both doing fine.

'We also saw several other families who had been living in tents for over three months while waiting to rebuild their homes. They told us the tents have made a real difference to their lives following the landslides as they gave them more space and privacy after having to share a single house before.'

'People afraid'

Bruce Dearnley makes up the other half of the SRT: 'The ground in the area is still unstable with large cracks appearing around the homes on the higher slopes. People are afraid to return to their houses, especially when it rains, so we will be sending an additional 100 boxes to bring them shelter and safety.'

Meanwhile another SRT is travelling to Uganda in response to the conflict in the south.

The rebel group M23 assaulted and captured Goma, a city in Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), bringing violence and tensions. As a result 700 people are crossing the border from DRC to Uganda each day.

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