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South Sudan crisis

Updated: Wed, 19 Feb 2014

Introduction

South Sudan separated from the north on July 9, 2011, after southerners voted overwhelmingly to secede in a referendum held in January 2011.

The referendum was a key part of Sudan's peace agreement which in 2005 formally ended the 21-year civil war between the government in Khartoum and rebels in the south.

The separation of the south from the rest of Sudan is fraught with tensions and unresolved flashpoints.

Within South Sudan, armed groups threaten the region's peace, and tribal clashes over land, water and cattle are common.

In December 2013, fighting broke out between government forces and rebels loyal to former vice president Riek Machar and spread across the country, threatening to push it into civil war. More than half a million people were displaced before a ceasefire was signed in January 2014. But the fighting continues, and many more have been displaced.

Read the full South Sudan briefing

South Sudan separated from the north on July 9, 2011, after southerners voted overwhelmingly to secede in a referendum held in January 2011.

The referendum was a key part of Sudan's peace agreement which in 2005 formally ended the 21-year civil war between the government in Khartoum and rebels in the south.

The separation of the south from the rest of Sudan is fraught with tensions and unresolved flashpoints.

Within South Sudan, armed groups threaten the region's peace, and tribal clashes over land, water and cattle are common.

In December 2013, fighting broke out between government forces and rebels loyal to former vice president Riek Machar and spread across the country, threatening to push it into civil war. More than half a million people were displaced before a ceasefire was signed in January 2014. But the fighting continues, and many more have been displaced.

Read the full South Sudan briefing