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South Sudan crisis

Updated: Mon, 4 Aug 2014

Introduction

South Sudan separated from the north and became independent on July 9, 2011, after southerners voted overwhelmingly to secede in a referendum in January 2011, following a peace agreement in 2005 which formally ended the 21-year civil war between the government in Khartoum and rebels in the south.

The secession of the south is fraught with tensions and unresolved flashpoints.

Within South Sudan, armed groups threaten the region's peace, and tribal clashes over land, water and cattle are common.

In December 2013, fighting broke out between government forces and rebels loyal to former vice president Riek Machar and spread across the country. Despite two ceasefire agreements, the fighting continues and has displaced hundreds of thousands of people.

The United Nations has repeatedly warned that a food crisis now gripping the country could develop into a full-scale famine.

Read the full South Sudan briefing.

South Sudan separated from the north and became independent on July 9, 2011, after southerners voted overwhelmingly to secede in a referendum in January 2011, following a peace agreement in 2005 which formally ended the 21-year civil war between the government in Khartoum and rebels in the south.

The secession of the south is fraught with tensions and unresolved flashpoints.

Within South Sudan, armed groups threaten the region's peace, and tribal clashes over land, water and cattle are common.

In December 2013, fighting broke out between government forces and rebels loyal to former vice president Riek Machar and spread across the country. Despite two ceasefire agreements, the fighting continues and has displaced hundreds of thousands of people.

The United Nations has repeatedly warned that a food crisis now gripping the country could develop into a full-scale famine.

Read the full South Sudan briefing.