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Central African Republic troubles

Updated: Wed, 21 May 2014

Introduction

Landlocked Central African Republic (CAR) has for years experienced one of the most silent and forgotten emergencies in the world, according to the United Nations.

The government has little presence or control outside the capital after years of instability and a history of frequent coups and mutinies.

The most recent coup took place in March 2013, when fighters from the Seleka rebel alliance ousted President Francois Bozize, accusing him of failing to uphold his end of a January 2013 peace deal.

It triggered widespread violence across the country, fears of possible genocide to come, and caused the U.N. Security Council to authorise international troops to use force if necessary to protect civilians.

Self-defence militias sprang up in response to Seleka abuses, and began targeting Muslim civilians, forcing most of them to flee their homes.

The education system and health services are in tatters after years of fighting, and the country's life expectancy, child mortality and HIV rates are among the worst in the world.

Despite an abundance of diamonds, uranium and gold, it is one of the poorest states in Africa.

Read the full briefing.

Landlocked Central African Republic (CAR) has for years experienced one of the most silent and forgotten emergencies in the world, according to the United Nations.

The government has little presence or control outside the capital after years of instability and a history of frequent coups and mutinies.

The most recent coup took place in March 2013, when fighters from the Seleka rebel alliance ousted President Francois Bozize, accusing him of failing to uphold his end of a January 2013 peace deal.

It triggered widespread violence across the country, fears of possible genocide to come, and caused the U.N. Security Council to authorise international troops to use force if necessary to protect civilians.

Self-defence militias sprang up in response to Seleka abuses, and began targeting Muslim civilians, forcing most of them to flee their homes.

The education system and health services are in tatters after years of fighting, and the country's life expectancy, child mortality and HIV rates are among the worst in the world.

Despite an abundance of diamonds, uranium and gold, it is one of the poorest states in Africa.

Read the full briefing.